Why am I depressed ?

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Feeling under the weather? 


Seasonal disorder or SAD is more than just wishing for warm weather during the gloomy winter months. We need sunshine to help keep our body’s internal clock functioning like it should. Daily exposure to just 15 to 20 minutes of sunshine can be enough to reap the benefits. Along with Vitamin D, the sun also supplies us with Nitric Oxide (NO). NO is imperative to the human body as a tool for regulating important physiological processes, including metabolism. Proper exposure to NO from the sun will help keep your metabolism running smoothly and discourage overeating. Vitamin D deficiencies can lead to the development of prostate and breast cancer, memory loss, and an increased risk for developing dementia and schizophrenia.

  • People who have depression go outdoors less, so they are less likely to have adequate vitamin D in their blood.

  • Research does seem to show a link between low levels of vitamin D in the blood and symptoms of depression

depressionOmega-3 deficiency


If you don’t eat enough omega-3 fatty acids, you can be at an increased risk for depression. To get your omegas, just eat fatty fish – like salmon, sardines and tuna.

Healthy fats, known as essential fatty acids (EFAs) come in several different forms including the omega-3 and omega-6 type. Our modern lifestyle intake of omega-3 fats tends to be low. A rich natural source of omega-3 fats is oily fish. These contain two main types of omega-3 fatty acid; eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).

Within the body, EPA and DHA are found in very high concentration in brain tissue and are believed to play an important role in nerve function and mood regulation.

There is a lot of evidence linking depression to omega-3 fat deficiency. One study published in 1996 found that depression was associated with a relative deficiency of EPA.

The chemistry of the brain is finely tuned, and can be upset by certain foodstuffs.

Perhaps two of the most disruptive dietary elements are sugar and caffeine

Medications
Depression is a side effect of many medications. Be sure to check the side effects of any new medications you take.

Poor relationships
You may have friends or co-workers who are a negative influence on you. Over time, the negative attitudes of others can wear off on you. Watch out for jealousy at home or in the work place people are sneaky and use subtle comments to bring you down.

Dismissive remarks about their partner’s appearance and attempts at conversation become the norm. With verbal attacks, they try to manipulate partners into believing they’re the ones in need of help and cause them to question their own judgment. At social gatherings, the depressed partners can make cutting remarks and ignore their partners while engaging happily with everyone else. At the worst, verbal abuse can even escalate to physical attacks.

One of the hallmarks of depression is the overpowering sense of worthlessness. Self-esteem is replaced with self-contempt. An inner voice persuades the partner to think this way: I can’t do anything right, and I’ve never been able to. I’m just too stupid. Everyone else may think I’m fine but they just don’t know what really goes on inside me.

If you are experiencing abuse from a partner, at work or at home. This person may be a narcissist look at this article here. I have directly experienced this myself and at first you don`t even know that they are like this. As soon as you understand whats going on things get much better. they person that`s annoying you may not be a narcissist here are some other articles to help you. Jealousy in relationships, Harassment at work & Growing up with a narcissistic mother.

Under active thyroid

The link between an under active thyroid and depression has been documented. Up to 50% of people with hypothyroidism will have some depression-like symptoms. It’s worth having your thyroid hormone levels checked if you are feeling depressed, along with other symptoms such as fatigue, dry skin, cold sensitivity or hair loss.

The psychiatric disturbances which accompany hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism, the two commonest thyroid disorders, mimic mental illness. People with an overactive thyroid may exhibit marked anxiety and tension, emotional lability, impatience and irritability, distractible overactivity, exaggerated sensitivity to noise, and fluctuating depression with sadness and problems with sleep and the appetite. In extreme cases, they may appear schizophrenic, losing touch with reality and becoming delirious or hallucinating. An underactive thyroid can lead to progressive loss of interest and initiative, slowing of mental processes, poor memory for recent events, fading of the personality’s colour and vivacity, general intellectual deterioration, depression with a paranoid flavour, and eventually, if not checked, to dementia and permanent harmful effects on the brain. In instances of each condition, some persons have been wrongly diagnosed, hospitalized for months, and treated unsuccessfully for psychosis.

Toxic household mold

The mold found in many homes across the country is microscopic fungi that grow on any host surface. Although mold prefers to grow and even thrives on certain surfaces like paper, cloth, wood, etc, it can grow just about anywhere if the conditions are right. This means mold could even grow on concrete or glass. They are survivors and very adaptable, easily able to not just survive but thrive in many home environments.

Most often molds found in the home are caused by some type of water damage or brought in from the outside to grow and flourish. Indoor flooding, leaking pipes or windows, and leaking roofs all are common causes of indoor mold.

The dangerous or toxic molds are those molds that produce mycotoxins. Mycotoxins are known to cause allergic and other adverse health reactions in animal species.

In small amounts molds are generally not harmful. When the levels grow unchecked the spores become airborne. This is where the potential health problems arise, especially in susceptible individuals.

 

Photo credit : https://www.flickr.com/photos/45635774@N00/2687450903

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